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NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) — From 2010 to 2020, more than 600,000 people moved to Tennessee, according to the Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT).

More people means more traffic, and TDOT now has the “OK” to move forward with a toll lane project that could help with road congestion.

 

 

American Baptist College, a private institution, is marking its 100th year since its establishment in 1924. The college was founded with the mission of training rural clergy and has become known for producing influential Civil Rights leaders.

Notable alumni, such as the late Representative John Lewis and minister-author C-T Vivan, are both about this college’s rich legacy.

President Dr. Forrest E. Harris Sr. takes pride in the school’s extensive history, emphasizing its role in molding future leaders dedicated to social justice and community transformation. He envisions American Baptist College continuing to be a beacon of education for the next generation.

“The young people today are very alert and aware of their struggle against systemic injustices that have accumulated over the years to create these disparities. They must be trained and educated. They have to be given vocabularies, and language and tools to fight those systems of injustice,” Harris explained.

The college played a significant role in the Civil Rights movement, with students participating in the desegregation of Nashville lunch counters alongside Meharry, Fisk, and TSU. “We were the first to desegregate downtown, a city in the south. That was significant for the South,” Harris said.

This history is a source of pride for students like Aaron Ford and Courtney Howard. Howard expresses the transformative impact of the college, stating, “It teaches you ways of life and how to navigate life.” American Baptist College is not just an educational institution; it is a crucible for shaping individuals who go on to make meaningful contributions to society, Harris adds.